spiritual writings | retreat center directory

You're invited to visit our sister site DanJoseph.com, a resource site
featuring articles on spirituality, psychology, and A Course in Miracles.

Home | Writings | General | Hendricks | Corporate Mystic part 3 | next   
Excerpted from The Corporate Mystic by By Gay Hendricks, Ph.D. and Kate Ludeman, Ph.D.. Copyright© 1997 by Gay Hendricks, Ph.D. and Kate Ludeman, Ph.D.. Excerpted by permission of Bantam Books, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.  HTML and web pages copyright © by SpiritSite.com.
 


"The number one cause of integrity disasters is looking the other way, not facing them straight on in the early stages. Some of us postpone it for a lifetime."

Hendricks and Ludeman, The Corporate Mystic, Part 3

Mystics do not waste time with regret; they put their energy into solutions. Sometimes it's as simple as telling whatever truth wasn't told the first time around. Other times you must handle the wounded feelings of the person on the other end of the perpetration. An agreement may need to be renegotiated or an apology issued. Whatever the action, you won't know until you raise the question: "What needs to be done here to fix this and move one"

Once you have determined that a painful phone call has to be made, it is wise to do it before you do anything else. Integrity problems fester faster once you know about them but before you've acted on them. Usually, what is required is a communication or an action, and sometimes both. If your employee has been stealing from Widow Smith's account, you have to replace the money, fire the employee, and give the widow a full accounting of the story. Act quickly and leave no loose ends.

The mystic's response can be broken into four steps.

First: Face squarely what happened.

The number one cause of integrity disasters is looking the other way, not facing them straight on in the early stages. Some of us postpone it for a lifetime. An example: A man who headed one of America's largest companies was having an affair with a charismatic woman, a vice-president some years his junior. As the buzz began to spread through the organization, his top aide told him that he needed to face the situation squarely. The aide later said that his boss literally looked out the window and changed the subject! The cost of not facing it squarely escalated quickly. Soon, with the board of directors on his back, the boss issued a heated denial, saying that he and the vice-president were "just friends." Nobody believed it, and time showed why. Later, after the axe had fallen, the two were quietly married.

The question remains: Why not just face things squarely and cop to them? The answer is the fear that most of us carry with us from junior high school on: We don't want to get caught and look stupid. Mystics know a secret that cures them of this fear: By the time we start getting scared of being caught and looking stupid, we've already been caught and we already look stupid. We have caught ourselves. Might as well admit it cheerfully and get on with it.

next ->