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Selections from Tao Te Ching by Lao-Tzu. 
Translation 1891 by James Legge

 


"Much speech to swift exhaustion lead we see; 
Your inner being guard, and keep it free."

Tao Te Ching, Chapter Five

Heaven and earth do not act from (the impulse of) any wish to be benevolent; they deal with all things as the dogs of grass are dealt with. The sages do not act from (any wish to be) benevolent; they deal with the people as the dogs of grass are dealt with. 

May not the space between heaven and earth be compared to a bellows? 

'Tis emptied, yet it loses not its power; 
'Tis moved again, and sends forth air the more. 
Much speech to swift exhaustion lead we see; 
Your inner being guard, and keep it free. 

 

Tao Te Ching, Chapter Six

The valley spirit dies not, aye the same; 
The female mystery thus do we name. 
Its gate, from which at first they issued forth, 
Is called the root from which grew heaven and earth. 
Long and unbroken does its power remain, 
Used gently, and without the touch of pain. 

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